To all the people who make mistakes — here is some good advice…

 

[tweetthis remove_twitter_handles=”true” remove_hidden_hashtags=”true” remove_hidden_urls=”true”]“To make no mistakes is not in the power of man, but from their errors and mistakes the wise and good learn wisdom for the future.” –Plutarch[/tweetthis]

“To make no mistakes is not in the power of man, but from their errors and mistakes the wise and good learn wisdom for the future.”
–Plutarch

Everyone makes mistakes.

Everyone makes mistakes. If you think about it, you’ve probably made your share of ridiculous mistakes over the years – a misdirected package, a misrouted file, a forgotten deadline.

Typical reactions? Embarrassment, anger, and frustration.

There is great virtue to making mistakes but then learning from them and improving along the way. Why don’t people realise that mistakes are really great opportunities? When you fix a problem, you not only get a chance to right a wrong, but you can build a strong working relationship too.

 

You can recover from blunders and be a winner!

Here’s how:

  • Make things right.Your first responsibility is to correct the mistake. The faster you address the problem, the more credible you’ll decidedly come across to others.
  • Apologise. When you make a mistake, you’ll usually gain some respect when apologising sincerely and directly. Consewquently, you don’t run the risk of appearing incompetent. Instead, you display your humaness gracefully. You also send out the message that you’re sincere enough to admit it.
  • Let the matter rest. There is no need to beat a dead horse by bringing up the matter over and over again. One apology will suffice.
  • Learn more about operations. Use the occasion to learn more about the intricacies of your department or campus operations. This knowledge will come in handy over time. And it can prevent mistakes down the line.
  • Ask if you can do something else. After correcting your error, ask if you can help in any other way. Perhaps an “I’m sorry” doesn’t seem sufficient. Offering something extra may be necessary to establish futher relationship-goodwill.
  • Let others know that you’ve learnt something. Assure those affected by your error that it won’t happen again. If you have indeed learnt something from the experience—that may well be helpful for others in your office—then share the information in a positive manner.
  • Keep records. Keep a record of errors made: the causes and the solutions. Review the list of mistakes to prevent a recurrence thereof.

Put your best foot forward and get on with being the best you can be.

Now smile, put your best foot forward and get on with being the best you can be.Now go on deliver that outstanding service that far exceeds your client’s expectations.[tweetthis remove_twitter_handles=”true” remove_hidden_hashtags=”true” remove_hidden_urls=”true”][Paymaster says] — “Put your best foot forward and get on with being the best you can be.”[/tweetthis]